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Advocate pushes for Revenge Porn Bill

A new state bill would make it a crime to post revenge porn. / Dre Dabars

There's a lot to take note of at the Oklahoma State Capitol.

"There are a lot of men out there. There are just a lot of men out there. I hope they're making good choices," said Heavin Taylor.

From mascots to politicians, there were plenty of people Heavin ran into at the Oklahoma State Capitol building.

However, it didn't matter who-or what- she saw, her focus was continuing her fight against revenge porn.

"We're only on step one," said Oklahoma State Senator, David Holt. "I feel like I'm on step 20 already. I'm relieved. I feel like I'm at the tail end of it and you feel like you're at the beginning," said Heavin.

In February, KTUL first introduced you to Heavin. For years, Heavin had been a victim of revenge porn after someone she once trusted posted naked photos of her online. For years -- Heavin has had to fight the battle herself but now lawmakers are taking the baton.

"I think it will definitely think it will take a stand for women in Oklahoma," said Holt, who introduced SB 1257.

Holt's bill, SB 1257, would make it a crime to post revenge porn. The first offense would be a misdemeanor, but the second offense would be a felony with the possibility of jail time and/or a fine. SB 1257 sailed through the senate in a 42-2 vote.

Now the bill has moved into the house, and its author is Representative John Paul Jordan.

"I appreciate the fact that you took your story- and instead of allowing the embarrassment to force you into hiding, you turned around and you found some strength and actually became an advocate to make sure that what happened to you doesn't happen to others," Jordan told Heavin.

Heavin spent the day talking with legislators, making sure they knew her face and voice.

"I started receiving threats- a rape threat every now and then started to become normal," Heavin told lawmakers.

For a long time, Heavin said she felt alone in her fight but after a day at the capitol, Heavin left with one feeling she couldn't shake- hope.

"It's gotten a lot more attention. I think it'll go through. If it doesn't- there will be a lot of backlash. But that could be a good thing- still bringing attention to it. But I think Oklahoma will go on the right side of this."

The next step for the bill will be for it to be assigned to a House committee. If it goes through committee, it'll be put on the House floor. If it passes the house, it will go back to the Senate, and then onto the Governor's desk.

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