MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

Road to the CMAs: A day at the Pioneer Woman's famous Oklahoma ranch

It’s a breathtaking view tucked under the Oklahoma sky in a corner of God’s country, otherwise known as Osage County. A rugged place, largely unchanged by time. It’s the kind of place that generations proudly call home. (KTUL)

Road to the CMAs is brought to you locally by Hard Rock Hotel.

PAWHUSKA, Okla. (KTUL) -- A cattle ranch outside of Pawhuska isn’t just a beautiful piece of the country but a backdrop for a hit television show.

“The Pioneer Woman” regularly features daily life out at the ranch. Channel 8 was given an exclusive look at a day in the life of an Oklahoma cowboy.

“The sunrises out here are beautiful. When you can watch it from the back of a horse, that’s really about as good as it gets,” said Ladd Drummond, husband to Ree.

ROAD TO THE CMAs |Oklahoma honky tonks live on at Willie's Saloon

It’s a breathtaking view tucked under the Oklahoma sky in a corner of God’s country, otherwise known as Osage County. A rugged place, largely unchanged by time. It’s the kind of place that generations proudly call home.

“I’m definitely a cowboy, all these guys earn their living working cattle, so everybody here is a cowboy,” said Drummond.

He's widely known as Marlboro Man thanks to his wife, Ree Drummond, the “Pioneer Woman.” Drummond isn’t just a face on television, but a genuine Oklahoma cowboy. It runs in the family.

“I love this pond here because I’ve got some great old photos of my dad sorting cattle with his dad and his grandfather,” said Drummond.

The ranch is a modern-day version of a family dream that started 130 years ago. The first Drummond, Frederick, a Scottish Immigrant, moved to what was then Indian Territory. They’ve been ranching cattle longer than Oklahoma has been a state. It’s an unbroken chain of Drummonds, living the cowboy life and an Oklahoma dream.

ROAD TO THE CMAS | Carrie Underwood, from Checotah to superstar, still an Oklahoma girl

“It’s probably the best part for me,” said Drummond. “I work with my dad, I get to work with my kids, I work with my brother, and the guys who’ve been with us are like family too.”

He said, for a time in college, he wasn’t planning on continuing his family tradition. But there’s something about the ranch and the feeling it gives you.

“It’s a beautiful area, I love it,” said Drummond. “A lot of people look at it and think it’s flat. You’ve got rolling hills, creeks and trees.”

The beauty comes at the price of hard work and early mornings. When you depend on God for the sunshine, rain, wind and warmth faith becomes a priority.

“You have no control over the weather,” said Drummond. “You’ve got to trust God and pray it all works out.”

He’s not sure his kids want to take the reins when he’s done, but he knows the ranch has a pull -- it’s own center of gravity that can’t be ignored. A call to a cowboy, to his family and to a tradition that’s alive and well.

Trending