MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

Judgment day could be coming for the Abundant Life Building

It was built in 1957 when natural light was looked at as old fashioned and air conditioning was being installed in new buildings. So the structure doesn't have any windows. (KTUL)

TULSA, Okla. (KTUL) - One of the most controversial buildings in this city could soon have a bright new future because the Abundant Life Building at 17th and Boulder is for sale.

That's where it gets interesting.

There are some very different options when it comes to how the building will be revived.

But even the owners admit the vast majority of people would like to see it torn down.

It was built in 1957 when natural light was looked at as old fashioned and air conditioning was being installed in new buildings. So the structure doesn't have any windows.

It was also built to be the home of the Oral Roberts Ministry, so it needed a TV studio and the building's form followed function.

Preservationists would like to see it restored the right way and some potential buyers have talked about it.

But Shane Shanan, who lives nearby, told us he would like to see a total face lift. He said it would benefit the entire area.

"it's the most beautiful part of Tulsa in my opinion," Shanan said. "To me, it's the central hub. I don't know why it's not already developed. I'm excited to see what happens with it."

It could become a very different, mixed-use building with wide terrace and glass walls for the upper-floor condos.

That concept has been suggested by architect Brian Freese, who's one of the partners selling the building.

While he has new looks in mind he said he's open to all possibilities.

"Frankly it’s hard to love at first," Freese said. "We over time have gotten so many negative comments and everybody says mow it down. God, take it down. Well, there is embedded value in the building."

Freese said it has a heavy support structure that could allow a 12-story tower and all the building's Carrera marble could be reused.

But he's something of a convert when it comes to the building.

"I've kind circled around to its original beauty," Freese said.

He hopes that whatever happens, the next incarnation of the building will become a gateway to downtown Tulsa.

Trending