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Radio host: Brumbaugh showed us we don't have to be enemies

For the past four years, State Representative David Brumbaugh's voice could be heard at the state capitol, and on the airwaves at Tulsa Public Radio (KTUL).

For the past four years, State Rep. David Brumbaugh's voice could be heard at the state capitol and on the airwaves at Tulsa Public Radio.

Until his death on Saturday, Brumbaugh and Democratic State Rep. Eric Proctor were a regular part of a political talk show.

John Durkee, station director and host of the show, said the pair made a great combination.

"They had very different views, but they got along, and that was the magic," said Durkee.

Durkee said things always remained civil.

"They always discussed the issue, and often, before the end of the program, they would find that elusive common ground," Durkee said.

Proctor said Brumbaugh was a man you could trust.

"If he told you something, you could take it to the bank," Proctor said. " He was always honest, always caring, always genuine, a true gem of a human being."

Brumbaugh and Proctor were two men on different ends of the political spectrum who would end up becoming friends.

"He was a true statesman, and he's going to be missed," Proctor said.

Durkee said with Brumbaugh and Proctor, the show had a powerful lesson.

"You can disagree and not be enemies. And, if the program has any lasting bearing, I hope that's the legacy of that segment," he said.

Like Proctor, Durkee considered Brumbaugh a friend. He's sad that friend had to go so soon.

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