MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

Thousands show up for Women's March, fight for human rights

For some at the Guthrie Green, their concerns couldn't fit on a poster board, but they hope the march in Tulsa and others across the world will initiate change. (KTUL)

TULSA, Okla. (KTUL) -- Right here in Tulsa, thousands took to the streets, expressing their beliefs, wants and needs for women's rights and desire for change.

The crowd roared as speakers talked about women making their voices heard.

Participants at the second Women's March in downtown Tulsa voiced many concerns for both men and women.

Sexism and racism are at the top of the list of things they say need to be changed in 2018, but most agreed on one thing: they just want to be heard.

"Equality, pay for women, representation and that the policies being passed aren't really representing women and why it is important for women to be out there," marcher Desiree Niss said.

People of all ages participated in the march, and parents used this day as a teaching tool for kids.

"It is really important for me to show them the values of the women out here, that men and women are equal and we want to be treated equally," marcher Cristi Martin said.

Martin's six year old daughter had a sign in tow saying, "the future is female." She may not understand everything right now, but Martin hopes she never has to.

"I want her to grow up thinking she can be anything she wants - a stay-at-home parent, a doctor, a construction worker...," Martin said.

Eight-year-old Ofelia and her friend Arcadia were also making noise at the Women's March.

Exactly the lesson Ofelia's mom, Desiree Niss, wants these girls to see and hear.

"To show them examples, to show them empowerment, to show them that you don't just sit at home and get frustrated and disappointed, but that you do something, you get involved," Niss said.

Although it is called the Women's March, it stretches far beyond just women's rights, but rather to support all rights.

"Everyone needs a voice," marcher April Robertson said. "It is not just about women, women need a voice definitely, but I am also here for the "dreamers," for DACA, for immigration and immigrants who make this country better."

Many marchers were angry with the government shutdown and President Trump's plan to end DACA in March.

"We feel they are Americans," Niss said. "It isn't about where you were born, but where you grew up."

For 17 years, Rosalia Hinojos stayed quiet because of where she was born, until a few days ago.

"I became an American citizen last week," Hinojos said.

She's lived in the United States for more than 20 years, but she spent more than half of that time fighting for a green card and ultimately U.S. citizenship.

"It is really sad because we lost special moments, like when one of my sisters passed away and I couldn't go because I don't have my passport or visa or green card or protection and I had to wait here," Hinojos said.

For some at the Guthrie Green, their concerns couldn't fit on a poster board, but they hope the march in Tulsa and others across the world will initiate change.

This year's focus is getting more people registered to vote.


close video ad
Unmutetoggle ad audio on off

Trending