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Voter numbers increased after Super Tuesday

Voter turnout increased after Super Tuesday(KTUL)

The Tulsa County Election Board is still processing thousands of new voter registrations applications that came in on Super Tuesday. The new applications came along with 44-percent of registered voters showing up to cast their ballots, 5 percent more than those that showed up in 2008, for President Obama's primary.

Now, the goals in Tulsa County is to convince more citizens to register and to vote.

"You can see the people my age are out there voting consistently," said Mary Jane Lindaman, of The League of Women Voters.

Lindaman is on a mission to get as many younger people registered as she can.

"When people don't vote they lose their voice, they lose a piece of power," said Lindaman. She and the League of Women voters are powering up for a strong election year, inviting citizens to register in their lobby or at upcoming events.

The election board is reeling with the number of ballots that came in.

"There is roughly 327-thousand registered voters in Tulsa county and so the turnout was about 44-percent and we had anticipated about 30-percent," said Patty Bryant, Tulsa County Election Board Secretary.

Bryant says they are still counting three thousand new voter registration applications that came in on Election Day, an indication that the general election in November could overwhelming.

"I think maybe the general election will be even larger turnout so yes, there will be some lines and you will have to wait a little bit," said Bryant.

Mary Jane is counting on and working for just that.

"We want all people to get out and vote."The Tulsa County Election Board is still processing thousands of new voter registrations applications that came in on Super Tuesday. The new applications came along with 44-percent of registered voters showing up to cast their ballots, 5 percent more than those that showed up in 2008, for President Obama's primary.

Now, the goals in Tulsa County is to convince more citizens to register and to vote.

"You can see the people my age are out there voting consistently," said Mary Jane Lindaman, of The League of Women Voters.

Lindaman is on a mission to get as many younger people registered as she can.

"When people don't vote they lose their voice, they lose a piece of power," said Lindaman. She and the League of Women voters are powering up for a strong election year, inviting citizens to register in their lobby or at upcoming events.

The election board is reeling with the number of ballots that came in.

"There is roughly 327-thousand registered voters in Tulsa county and so the turnout was about 44-percent and we had anticipated about 30-percent," said Patty Bryant, Tulsa County Election Board Secretary.

Bryant says they are still counting three thousand new voter registration applications that came in on Election Day, an indication that the general election in November could overwhelming.

"I think maybe the general election will be even larger turnout so yes, there will be some lines and you will have to wait a little bit," said Bryant.

Mary Jane is counting on and working for just that.

"We want all people to get out and vote."

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